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Author Topic: Avoiding Accidents  (Read 364 times)

WhiteKnightLeo88

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Avoiding Accidents
« on: March 03, 2013, 11:53:13 PM »

Hi guys,
First time user to this forum (Or any type of forum for that matter) so go easy on me please.

Id just like to know, being a new rider, is there anything I can do to reduce the chances of becoming a fatality. Apart from the obvious of wearing protective gear whenever I jump on it, and riding around the local streets and empty shopping car parks until I get comfortable enough to ride amongst cars, is there anything else that I can do to reduce the risk?? I guess what Im asking is Is there anything they dont tell you when you complete your Q-Ride Course.

Thanks for advice.
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DrunkenMistake

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Re: Avoiding Accidents
« Reply #1 on: March 04, 2013, 02:18:43 AM »

Pretend every prick is out to kill you and you will be right,
And most of all dont try and show off, believe me.. It never ends well...
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DaBigMac

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Re: Avoiding Accidents
« Reply #2 on: March 04, 2013, 04:36:01 AM »

I remember an instroctor one told me something quite useful. You should roll through a thought process:

1. What can I see?
2. How could this harm me?
3. How can I reduce the risk?

Action step 3 and go back to step 1.

DBM
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joel352

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Re: Avoiding Accidents
« Reply #3 on: March 04, 2013, 09:29:47 AM »

If in doubt use your horn. The other driver may flip you the bird but at least that means he has seen you. ;D
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diablos

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Re: Avoiding Accidents
« Reply #4 on: March 04, 2013, 10:48:34 AM »

Stuff i did to minimise/mitigate risk;

1: quality gear, i use a 2 piece dionese and dianese boots that look kinda like shoes, just a bit heavier.
2: scan constantly, any side street, driveway, pedistrian crossing etc is a hazard. Consider EVERYTHING to be a hazard until its behind you.
3: expect stupidity, i know ask myself, "what the dumbest thing this guy could do right now", and buffer for that
4: buzzword of the day "BUFFER". buffer for everything, buffer means leave yourself enough room to react without bailing.
5: pedestrians are retards, they do stupid shit alll the god damn time.. "uleh, do a wheelie cuz", "pop a mono bruddah" etc etc
6: cars with "p" plates are retards, worse than learners, they like to "think" their faster than you.
7: dont split moving traffic
8: dont show off
9: RELAX while riding, dont be tense, and learn to lean early.
10: LOUD EXHAUST FOR ROAD AWARENESS, do not be timid in pulling the clutch and blipping the revs up around 5-6k, so many times ive been cut off, your horn is loud, a motor bike Vtwin with a debaffled exhaust is louder...

one more thing would be to practice braking into a corner and dropping back into first, i learned to traffic ride in Sydney, cars do not/will not "stop" to give way when ur trying to turn, they just try to squeeze around you, took me a while to smoothly drop back into first at 35-50km/h on the HYO, master BLIPPING your throttle to get back into 1st gear, i find 2nd gear is labouring when im making a 90o left/right turn. Dont be scared to pop back into first and give it a small boot full.

Thats all the crap i could think of that helped me going through my learners, i had a decade of dirt squirting experience, i must say all drivers have lapses of judgment, some more than others, as a rider you cannot differentiate one from the other.

 
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csgary

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Re: Avoiding Accidents
« Reply #5 on: March 04, 2013, 07:54:47 PM »

Try to be as visible as possible, bright/reflective colors on the bike or riding gear definitely helps. I also ride with my high beam on during daylight hours and in my personal experience it makes a big difference in people acknowledging your existence.
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joel352

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Re: Avoiding Accidents
« Reply #6 on: March 04, 2013, 10:03:23 PM »

Try to be as visible as possible, bright/reflective colors on the bike or riding gear definitely helps. I also ride with my high beam on during daylight hours and in my personal experience it makes a big difference in people acknowledging your existence.
I live of my highbeam in the daytime. I would recomend using it. During the night I have a reflective wastecoat that goes over my bike jacket and folds up nicely under my seat. I would recomend one of them especialy if you in a city.
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WhiteKnightLeo88

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Re: Avoiding Accidents
« Reply #7 on: March 05, 2013, 05:41:53 AM »

I'm taking in all these comments and I really appreciate the input. Im gonna go out and grab some reflective gear on my way home this arvo. I think once I build up some confidence in myself whilst riding I will be right. I have been told that riding in the daytime with your high beam on is sensible and a great way of being noticed but I was also told it was illegal to ride around with it constantly. Has anyone been pulled up for it?
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Mirkon

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Avoiding Accidents
« Reply #8 on: March 05, 2013, 02:38:16 PM »

It is possible to get pulled up on it, but more likely you'll just have someone yell at you if you blind them.

Prevention is the best defense. Reflective tape will make you more visible, but unfortunately, not everyone will look.
Always look for an out, an escape path. Never sit in a blind spot or beside any vehicle for that matter.
I don't know your driving history but as you gain more time on the road, you learn to predict traffic movement. Correctly predicting traffic, and being prepared for an incorrect prediction, is what will keep you safe. Practice braking skills all the time.


Everyone has a few stories, here's one of mine.
A while back I was travelling down a highway and was coming up on an intersection, when the light turned orange. I decided to roll through it based on my speed and distance to intersection, so I didn't roll off the throttle. Fellow in the hatchback in front of me made the opposite decision and braked (I thought) a bit hard to stop.
I should have initially backed off but hey, I made the wrong decision and now have a rapidly slowing 1 tonne block of metal getting very big in front of me.
After a few involentary expletives I started emergency braking. I honestly thought that I would not pull up in time and would be on his back seat. Cars have more traction and better braking potential then a bike, so in a race to stop, I would lose.
I released the brakes for a moment and repointed my bike, aiming for the gap between lanes (cars queued to turn in adjacent lane). I pulled up, next to his rear wheels, throughly embarrassed (though happy with the brakes). Had I not repointed the bike, I believe I would have stopped just in time. But it's also likely that I could have locked the brakes or panicked and not braked hard enough...
Point of my story is that you have to always maintain a buffer and keep an escape route in mind, to help prevent your own incidents, as well as avoid any errant vehicles.
It's your practiced reactions and buffers that will make a difference between a painful story, and a cautionary tale.

Long post ! To summarize, practice emergency braking, and buffer for everything. Your life is in your hands, so don't put it in the hands of others.
« Last Edit: March 05, 2013, 02:46:10 PM by Mirkon »
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joel352

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Re: Avoiding Accidents
« Reply #9 on: March 05, 2013, 11:33:39 PM »

Even though your trafic light is green it doesnt mean that the people on the red light will stop, when setting off at some lights look left and right it could save you, it has saved me a few times from light jumpers. >:(
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