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Author Topic: Dual oxygen sensors  (Read 671 times)

Lhudson

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Dual oxygen sensors
« on: February 21, 2017, 11:00:06 PM »

Hi,
Do all EFI gv650s have 2 oxygen sensors? I think I've seen some with just the one, is that right? If so is that something I'd need to be careful of when buying an exhaust? I've seen lots of Leo Vince exhausts on eBay but they say up to 2012 models, did they change after that?
Thanks
Lee
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Hylife

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Re: Dual oxygen sensors
« Reply #1 on: March 19, 2017, 03:50:55 AM »

because no one has posted an answer for you,
Yes, all EFI 650 models have an EGO sensor for each cylinder.

The GV650 title is applied to two different models, the GV650 Pro and the GV650 Classic. In some markets the GV650 Classic is also known as the ST7 or GV700.
Both the pro and classic models have subtle differences but for this subject it is suffice to say that the exhaust differences relate only to the end can, being either a 2 into 1, or a 2 into 2.

Usually you will keep the exhaust headers and just replace the end can/s. The EGO sensors are in the headers.

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2011 GV250 - 2011 GV650C - It's not 'what' you ride, it's 'that' you ride.

umop-ǝpisdn

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Re: Dual oxygen sensors
« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2017, 11:39:07 PM »

Are you sure ALL the EFI GVs have dual O2?

I know my Daewoo ECU 2010 GT has only one O2 sensor.

I think that if it's a Delphi ECU, then it will have dual O2 sensors, but for the Daewoo ECU models, they've only got single O2 sensors.
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Hylife

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Re: Dual oxygen sensors
« Reply #3 on: March 22, 2017, 07:37:28 AM »

The early GT may be different.
I am prepared to be corrected on the GT, but for the GV (all EFI versions) each injector is controlled independently by the ECU, this requires an EGO sensor for each exhaust header.

Of course, an engine can be swapped out of another bike to replace a damaged one. I am sure there are plenty of GV's using a GT engine and visa-versa.

I guess that LHUDSON was tired when he/she posted because all they had to do is get off their fat arse and go look at the exhaust pipes on their bike.
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2011 GV250 - 2011 GV650C - It's not 'what' you ride, it's 'that' you ride.

Lhudson

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Re: Dual oxygen sensors
« Reply #4 on: March 31, 2017, 10:55:31 PM »

I have a 2013 bike but I'm aware EFI bikes have been around since late 2009 i think. I'm looking for an exhaust so i wanted to know if i could get a system from an old bike, nothing to do with me not getting off my fat arse you ****ing anorak.
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Hylife

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Re: Dual oxygen sensors
« Reply #5 on: April 02, 2017, 08:00:43 AM »

I have a 2013 bike but I'm aware EFI bikes have been around since late 2009 i think. I'm looking for an exhaust so i wanted to know if i could get a system from an old bike, nothing to do with me not getting off my fat arse you ****ing anorak.


At the time I failed to understand why you posted a question about something that is plainly obvious just by looking, but I see now that you were unaware of how exhaust systems interact on EFI engines.
EFI engines (car or bikes, and/or the year is irrelevant) work on a feed back system.
The fuel line is pressurised by an electric pump found in your fuel tank and a control box known as an ECU (engine control unit) opens the fuel injectors for a short period on each inlet stroke of the pistons. The length of the injector open-close time is the modern equivalent to a carburettor mixture setting and is determined by inputs from a range of sensors on the engine sending information to the ECU about things such as intake air temperature, coolant temperature, revs, speed, gear selection, intake air pressure, etc.
The final adjustment to the mixture is determined by a feedback loop about oxygen that is present in the exhaust gases.
Rather than sampling/measuring the wasted fuel of a poorly tuned engine, it is far simpler to measure the amount of oxygen that has or has not been consumed by the combustion process, since we know precisely how much oxygen is found in the atmosphere on our planet.
(The intake air pressure provides for adjustments necessary for changes in altitude above or below sea level)

If the mixture is too lean or too rich, the unused oxygen found in the exhaust gases is measured by an EGO (exhaust gas oxygen) sensor.
An EGO sensor has a zirconia based ceramic element coated in platinum. The EGO sensor operates like a miniature catalytic converter and glows red hot in the exhaust gases and the electrical resistance of the element changes with temperature.

If there is too much or too little oxygen in the exhaust gases, this is as a result of the fuel mixture being either to lean or too rich and that information is fed back to the ECU to make a correction to the injector open-close times.

IF you go and have a look at your bike then you will see that your exhaust system is no different in basic design to any automotive exhaust found on an EFI bike or car, it has solidly constructed headers coming out of the engine and then end cans are bolted on to handle noise reduction and catalytic conversion of the exhaust gases.
(Catalytic converters burn up unused fuel and are found in the cans that are attached to the headers on all modern vehicles).

You should be able to spot quite easily that there are indeed two EGO sensors, one for each cylinder and the EGO sensors are located in the headers, just like all bike and car exhausts.

When you get a new exhaust, headers are not replaced, only the rear cans.

If you look on the swing arm that the rear axel is connected to you will find a mandated plaque stating information about your exhaust systems manufacturer and the output sound levels.
In all UN member countries it is strictly illegal to modify your exhaust system in any way on any vehicle manufactured after 1989.
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2011 GV250 - 2011 GV650C - It's not 'what' you ride, it's 'that' you ride.

Lhudson

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Re: Dual oxygen sensors
« Reply #6 on: April 02, 2017, 10:51:58 PM »

Your last post was entirely for your benefit, give yourself a cookie, I'm going to crack one off.
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Hylife

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Re: Dual oxygen sensors
« Reply #7 on: April 06, 2017, 09:16:20 AM »

Your last post was entirely for your benefit, give yourself a cookie, I'm going to crack one off.

If you think that, then I was right, you were just too lazy to get off your arse and go look at your own bike and see if there was 1 or 2 EGO sensors.
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2011 GV250 - 2011 GV650C - It's not 'what' you ride, it's 'that' you ride.

Lhudson

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Re: Dual oxygen sensors
« Reply #8 on: April 07, 2017, 12:39:27 PM »

Did that make sense to anyone?
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