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Author Topic: (Poll) An outside perspective on Hyosung  (Read 259 times)

Christianleon266

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(Poll) An outside perspective on Hyosung
« on: May 11, 2018, 01:52:22 AM »

Hello everyone,

As I have had time to skim over this board I have noticed some... nastier opinions and back lash with past and present owners in regards to the quality and service provided for their motorcycles. From electrical issues, to garbage dealer support, and a plethora of fuel injection related failures and problems, it seems like these motorcycles are getting a bad reputation due to uneducated purchases, people paying less money and expecting the same level of service on par with Honda or Kawasaki. Which isn't an unreasonable expectation, especially since these are sold along side other, more pronounced brands. It's not like people here have bought their motorcylce from ali-express, or the like, They bought it from a dealer. With all that said, I figured it would be a good idea to share my opinions, ones coming from someone who got his bike free , and has no monetary or contractual obligations with a dealer/ Hyosung as a whole, and thus absolutely no attachment to this brand or particular motorcycle other then attempting to fix and restore one for joy riding. But first, some background on me.

I've been restoring Japanese, korean, and chinese motorcycles since I was 16 (7 years total). I absolutely love wrenching on bikes and thus most of the issues with the carbureted version of this bike are of no consequence to me, and can be avoided by upgrading/ modding/ retrofitting. I've owned a total now of about 10 bikes give or take a few, ranging from a 96 Kawasaki zx6r, 82 KZ750,  a 84 Honda V65 Magna, Sabre, 83 Golding, and 09 ninja 250 to name the memorable ones. They all had problems, except the Goldwing, which was bulletproof and in mint condition. The zx6r was a ground up restoration, rebuilt the motor, gearbox and all frame components, with some powdercoating mixed in too. The V65 was a torque monster, wished I had kept it. Which leads me to my current motorcycle and to the point of this post I guess: a 2007 Hyosung GT250R.

I got this bike from an older woman, who's daughter's ex left it at her home and bailed on her/ the kids. It seems relatively easy to work on, but you can get an idea where corners were cut, and once the plastic is off the bike it becomes clear some of the smaller details were of no concern to Hyosung:

  *The fitment of the airbox is terrible. The bolt holes do not align which is why I see a bunch on ebay with one of the tabs responsible for holding the air box broken off; probably to allow for
  more play in fitment. 

  *The charging system is poo. Under-gauged wire, a cheapo regulator/ rectifier and poor connections to the battery. A lot of posts here confirmed my suspicions of this, and I ended up
  retrofitting a 94 zx600 Reg/ Rec, and replacing all wires associated with the charging circuit. The 94 zx600 Reg/Rec is plug and play for this particular year of Hyosung.

  *Abysmal service manuals, particularly the Carburetor section. This is probably the worst of them all for me. Having to search this forum and dig through information from word of mouth / post
  is a PITA. Service manuals are supposed to be the "be all, end all" but with the lack of or mis-translation of information, AND given its gone on this long without correction, makes me sour, and
  leads to the same posts over and over again in these forums. Some of these include.
     -Incorrect float height. No attempts to correct. Called 5 dealers all across America, none had a clue what the correct setting was supposed to be.  Mine were set at 13mm.
     -No wet setting specification, despite mentioning a fuel level.
     -Incorrect arrangement of the vacuum slide/ jet needle parts in all service manuals for the 250 motor. Assembling by the book leads to overly rich midrange due to a +2mm needle shimming.
     -No mention or revision of the carb diagram for the 2006 onward Mikuni BDS-26's, which have an accelerator pump.
     -Consequently, No part numbers for those specific parts, and no method to ordering them, which leads to having to buy a whole used set for a single part. If you can find one that is.
     -No mention of the o-ring between the main jet and the emulsion tube, despite there clearly being one in my carbs
   
  *Vacuum pulse pumps can go suck a lemon. Who would put a pulse pump on a high revving sport bike, whose power range is CLEARLY out of optimal vacuum for the pump. A sport bike of
      this size sees full throttle and high rpms pretty much all the time. This is where vacuum is low/ and fuel demand is high. Not a good combo for something needing a strong vacuum. A 94
      zx600 carbureted fuel pump and mounting bracket can be modified to fit (with some wiring modifications too) without any consequences to jetting. You will notice a smoother ride when
      ringing the bike out thanks to actual fuel supply happening where it needs to.

The FZR-2KR and xv250 share the same carbs as this motorcycle, and the xv250 even has an accelerator pump if your looking for replacement parts on the rear cylinder carburetor. The xv250 manual has a correct arrangement of jet needle parts, and the FZR-2KR's float specs seem applicable to our bikes as a good base line to work with. (4-6mm using the clear tube method on the drains, 6-8mm dry float height.)

These are more or less my gripes with the bike, as well as how I went about fixing them. I genuinely hope that this helps people keep their bike, and not be turned away from used ownership. I say used ownership, because with the limited experience I have had with the dealers (granted, out of state dealers with nothing more then phone calls between 5 or 6 of them) I would NOT purchase one new. Repair quality, parts availability and warranty honoring is entirely dependent on the dealer, with little to no backing from Hyosung it seems. Each dealer on the west coast I spoke with had differing levels of what I would call presentation of knowledge, but they each shared the same consensus: Hyosung is terrible with communication with them, and most of them did not bother with specifics related to carburetors in the factory manual. Some didn't even have the manual, but it's usually the small fry dealerships here in the US that carry this brand. Take that as you will.

Which leads me to my conclusion, and I guess kind of a warning of sorts. If you don't like wrenching on stuff, or don't know how, this bike isn't for you. Period. Get a brand with decent customer support. You get exactly what you pay for here. Considering these are low to mid budget bikes most people in this market are doing their own service, and can't afford to replace a bunch of parts,  especially at service prices. If you ABSOLUTELY must have one of these as a first, spend a week finding a good dealer. If they have questionable reviews, don't do it. If there are none within 50 miles of you, don't do it. Thats a 100 mile tax added onto your bill whenever something breaks.

HOWEVER, if you a wrench happy service technician like me, then you're going to have a ball with this bike. I love working on stuff, maintaining and checking/ improving. Everything on this bike is crap/cheap and with a fairly bulletproof engine (as I've read, time will tell), and lack of resale value, theses bikes are fantastic tinker bikes. The Carbureted versions are, anyways. Fuel injected bikes, specifically cheap ones, never have appealed to me and are never a good idea in general to their carbureted brethren. Crap charging systems/ wiring + fairly expensive (and from reading the forums, failure prone) ECU and injectors = headaches and money. But that is biased because I hate fuel injection bikes, so take that as you will.

I posted this in the garbage forum but if a mod feels the information I provided is better elsewhere, feel free to move it. Any comments are encouraged, especially if you are located outside of my location. Arizona Doesn't have any Hyosung dealers to gauge service quality.


     

« Last Edit: May 11, 2018, 02:18:48 AM by Christianleon266 »
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2007 Kawasaki KX250F
1984 Yamaha Virago
1982 Honda V45 Sabre
1996 Kawasaki ZX6R
2009 Kawasaki Ninja 250
1984 Honda V65 Magna (Favorite)
1982 Kawasaki KZ750E
2005 Suzuki M50
1983 Honda Goldwing Aspencade
2007 Hyosung GT250R
1991 Honda ST1100 (current)

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AJC650

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Re: (Poll) An outside perspective on Hyosung
« Reply #1 on: May 11, 2018, 09:20:50 AM »

It is unfortunate that Hyosung do not seem to attract, or work to develop serious, committed dealerships, and this is possibly why so many people class them with cheap Chinese bikes.....they are often sold alongside these multiple brand, crappy 125's and scooters.

I was very fortunate to have a knowledgeable dealer here in Scotland, who supplied and serviced my bike and who had a generally high regard for Hyosung bikes.  He kept my bike in perfect trim over the 3 or so years I owned it, and I have answered your survey based on my experience.

However, in his opinion, Hyosung quality was dropping off a bit with newer bikes (mine was a 2010 EFI), then they stopped importing to UK for a while. Since a new importer took them on they have made no real impact on the UK market, and here in Scotland there are no dealers left, as far as I know.  They were sold in Glasgow for a while (alongside many cheap Chinese 125's and scooters!), but that dealer has now dropped them.

I'm not sure they'll ever really make it into the mainstream of motorcycle manufacturers, but maybe they'll prove me wrong......
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Christianleon266

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Re: (Poll) An outside perspective on Hyosung
« Reply #2 on: May 11, 2018, 10:15:03 AM »

The fact that the company has changed names and hands certainly does not aid in building a reputation, let alone a good one. Multiple times to be honest, and it certainly doesn't assure me that the current owner of KR motors has other ventures going on. Explains the lack of future development, or upkeep of the company.
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2007 Kawasaki KX250F
1984 Yamaha Virago
1982 Honda V45 Sabre
1996 Kawasaki ZX6R
2009 Kawasaki Ninja 250
1984 Honda V65 Magna (Favorite)
1982 Kawasaki KZ750E
2005 Suzuki M50
1983 Honda Goldwing Aspencade
2007 Hyosung GT250R
1991 Honda ST1100 (current)

umop-ǝpisdn

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Re: (Poll) An outside perspective on Hyosung
« Reply #3 on: May 11, 2018, 10:52:15 AM »

An amazing post Leon!

You should put the carb knowledge in the carb 101 thread for sure!

Nice intro also. Welcome matey.
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I used to be a sensitive, new age guy, but times have changed and now I am more of a caring, understanding, ninties type.

Christianleon266

  • Crown Service Technician. 80's bike enthusiast.
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Re: (Poll) An outside perspective on Hyosung
« Reply #4 on: May 11, 2018, 11:01:01 AM »

Thank you for the kind words. I actually wanted to create my own carb rebuild thread at some point, didn't notice the 101 thread initially. I found a thread on another site in which the very same carbs are on (Yamaha XJ600 Seca II carb rebuild). See the Link I have attached and let me know what you think, I will post both the link and the information I have found on that thread.

http://www.xjrider.com/viewtopic.php?t=668
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2007 Kawasaki KX250F
1984 Yamaha Virago
1982 Honda V45 Sabre
1996 Kawasaki ZX6R
2009 Kawasaki Ninja 250
1984 Honda V65 Magna (Favorite)
1982 Kawasaki KZ750E
2005 Suzuki M50
1983 Honda Goldwing Aspencade
2007 Hyosung GT250R
1991 Honda ST1100 (current)

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