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Author Topic: Shift Method: To GP or Not  (Read 203 times)

archaz

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Shift Method: To GP or Not
« on: January 05, 2019, 08:00:18 AM »

To GP shift or not, that is the question....  1 up, 5 down  vs.  Standard 1 down, 5 up

I have noticed that on my new bikes at the time (RC390 and G310GS) that they do not like to upshift so well making you look like some crazed psycho trying to get your bike to move on down the road from a stop light. Usually happens between 2-3 and 3-4 where multiple hits and clutches are required as your acceleration come to a grinding zero. Of course downshifting is no problem as you are pushing DOWN on the lever Not UP.

I have been wanting to change one of the bikes to "GP" and now I have finally done it with the 2017 GD250R. It was an easy fix. Just remove the bolt from the shifter attached to the rod coming out from the gearbox and rotating 180 degrees so that the arm faces up, instead of down. I will post some photos later today. I then adjusted the link to move the shift lever up ( I think I lower a little as the down shifts were more difficult).

So I only have about 30 miles of riding on it and it feels great. Going 2-3-4-5-6 was flawless and easy, no miss shifts and 100% positive. I had a little trouble with the downshifts 6-5-4-3-2 as I probably set the lever too high ( I will need to lower). I takes some thinking when downshifting and getting into neutral and 1st which will go away after a few days. Upshifting on the other hand is 100% natural just like putting your foot on the gas. Bang, bang, bang, your gone!

I am not switching back!!     

 Now for the practical side. It may not be such a great idea for scooter, cruiser and touring bikes. Off-road and Adventure bikes ??? Up to the way you ride as some stand on the pegs a lot and I don't know how that effects shifting.

I will try later on my G310GS and see how it feels. The RC390 requires a kit to change, so that will have to wait until summer.

Let me know if any of you have tried "GP" shifting and what you think.
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BikeBandit.com

umop-ǝpisdn

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Re: Shift Method: To GP or Not
« Reply #1 on: January 05, 2019, 11:14:56 PM »

I've never had an issue with slow shifting on Red. I don't 'tap' into gear though, I hold the lever up until I well and truly know it's in. This is something I have just always done and I've never had an issue with missed shifts.

What you describe has merit though and makes a lot of sense. It certainly doesn't sound like a difficult thing to switch back if you can't wrap your head around it. Good on you for having a red hot go at something new and different! It's been a while since I saw an innovation. LX_SS's gear position indicator and work with his dash cluster is the most recent one I can remember.
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I used to be a sensitive, new age guy, but times have changed and now I am more of a caring, understanding, ninties type.

archaz

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Re: Shift Method: To GP or Not
« Reply #2 on: January 06, 2019, 07:14:37 AM »

Well I took some photos and then froze to death riding around at 40-45 degrees F. I was waiting for this to happen and it did today no thanks to being cold and stiff. I was in a parking lot that slanted down to my right, the bike was stopped and I was shifting into neutral when the bike leaned over to the right and my foot was too close causing a controlled tip over. No damage to lights, fairing, etc., just a scratch in the end bar. Time to break out some black paint (well maybe in the spring). It sucks lifting a bike uphill when you are cold.

OK, so to convert  to GP you only need a 10mm socket, open and closed end wrench. The socket can only be used to remove the bolt since the linkage will prevent you from using it later.

1)  Remove bolt from shift arm. Then slide arm out off of shaft.
2)  Rotate 180 degrees (initially point down around 6 O'clock, now it will be pointing close to   Noon). You will see how the foot lever moves up and down so position close to where you want.
3)  Slide back in shaft and replace bolt. Note that there is an rounded indentation that the bolt slides over on the shaft.
4)  Final adjustment for foot lever can be made by loosening the 2 nuts at both end of the shift linkage and spinning the link to move lever up or down. If that is not enough, you will have to remove arm again and reposition.

* It shouldn't, but make sure arm does not hit engine case when shifting.
If you have any questions, I will answer as best I can.
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